digital-only art museum'

There are 520 computers, 470 projectors, an overwhelming scale and a completely new world characterised by complex and three-dimensional space 

- Toshiyuki Inoko, teamLab founder

“Currently, there aren’t any digital-only art museums,” teamLab founder Toshiyuki Inoko told CLADglobal. “We wanted to create an exhibition that delivers a borderless artwork world, and figured we needed to establish a museum in order to make that happen.

Art collective teamLab will open a unique Digital Art Museum on Thursday

Then there is the altogether different proposition put forth by experimental Japanese art collective, teamLab. Comprised of self-described "ultra-technologists" -- which includes designers, computer scientists, engineers and programmers -- the group, in collaboration with Tokyo-based urban developer Mori Building, plans to open a 107,000 square-foot museum (10,000 square meters) in Tokyo covered entirely with digital works.

continue reading

What to learn more?

“Future Park” is designed for children. The park has kids interact with the art through various games and activities, such as an aquarium teeming with digital fish designed by the kids themselves and a musical wall that plays sounds upon touch. The activities are designed to help expand the imagination and teach scientific concepts. 

'Ultra-technologists' to open digital-only museum in Tokyo

Then there is the altogether different proposition put forth by experimental Japanese art collective, teamLab. Comprised of self-described "ultra-technologists" -- which includes designers, computer scientists, engineers and programmers -- the group, in collaboration with Tokyo-based urban developer Mori Building, plans to open a 107,000 square-foot museum (10,000 square meters) in Tokyo covered entirely with digital works.

continue reading

Touch digital birds, sip flower tea and more at the world’s largest digital art museum

With over 107,000 square feet of space, the museum has 50 interactive displays that blend into one another over five different zones. The exhibit’s “borderless” name encourages breaking down barriers – barriers between one piece of art and another, art and its visitors, and one person and another

The second zone is the “Athletics Forest,” a zone intended to train the brain’s spatial recognition abilities and get people moving, according to teamLab. The space has visitors climbing on flashing poles, bouncing on a trampoline through a galaxy simulation and balancing on hanging boards that dangle in a show of colorful lights. 

Interactive, Digital Art Museum Opens in Tokyo